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Below you will  find the results of the Health and Temperament Survey as of January 15, 2002. The survey was developed to help pinpoint problems within the Cane Corso breed.  The survey was not limited to American born Cane Corso.  This survey is an ongoing process in which everyone can participate and we encourage anyone who hasn't already completed their survey to do so.  

We began the original collection of data January 2001.  Since then we have had over 209 surveys submitted.  177 of those surveys were submitted between March 2001 & December 2001.   The majority of surveys submitted were from pet owners.  We currently have 3 kennels which are participating.  Their data was not included in this initial report but will be included in the next report.  As of February 1, 2002, we have received over 15 additional surveys.    Every 6 months (providing we have a minimum of 30 new surveys) the data  will be submitted to the participating Universities and the current results will be reevaluated to include the newly submitted surveys.  Please note that the accuracy of the findings of this survey represent the data provided to us by those who participated and reflect percentages based on total surveys submitted not on the total Corso population. 

We would like to thank all the participants of the survey for making this huge undertaking possible.  We hope that the results of this survey will  bring much needed awareness to the issues that plague this wonderful breed.   For information on the Health & Temp. Survey  and to obtain a copy of the survey to submit, just click on the highlighted link.  

A huge thanks to Tracy Hennings for her time and efforts in setting up this page so that all can view and understand the findings of the survey!

 

The following is a breakdown of the age bracket of participants in the survey.   Please note that the majority of Corsos surveyed were between the ages of 4-24 months of age.

As of January 2002

1% of the Corsos surveyed were under 4 months of age. 81%  were between 4 -24 months of age. 14% were between the ages of 2-4 years old. 4% were over the age of 4.

 

  Health Survey Results

Orthopedic Conditions

 Canine Hip Dysplasia-  an irregular formation of the coxcofemoral (hip) joint.   Symptoms include lameness, reluctance to climb, play or run, bunny hop or unsteady gait and occasionally a temperament change.   Diagnosis is made only by radiographic examination. This disease is known to have a hereditary basis, but it is also believed that environmental factors can influence its manifestation.

As of January 2002

58% of dogs tested were confirmed by radiograph to be dysplasia affected.. 7% of dogs tested were confirmed by radiograph to have normal hip  joints. 35% of dogs remained untested.

Elbow Dysplasia- a degenerative disease of the joint formed at the elbow by the humerus, radius and ulna.   ED can have 3 forms.  Ununited anconeal process (UAP), fragmented coronoid process (FCP) and osteochondritis dissecans (OCD) * see below.  Symptoms include lameness in one or both front legs, reluctance to run or jump and pain upon over extension of limbs.  This disease remains one of the most under-diagnosed conditions in dogs.  Our statistics reflect this as well. 

As of January 2002

22% of dogs tested were confirmed by radiograph to be dysplasia affected. 3% of dogs tested were confirmed by radiograph to have normal elbow joints. 75% of dogs remain untested.

Knee Conditions-  2 conditions of the patellas are included.  Patellar Luxation and Anterior Cruciate Ligament injuries.  Patellar Luxation is defined as “slipping kneecaps”.  The patellas do not fit properly into the joint and dislocate as the dog walks.  Patellar Luxation has been shown to have a hereditary basis.  The Anterior Cruciate Ligament is one of 2 ligaments that hold the kneecap in its place.  Ruptures of this can be due to genetic influenced patellar defects and can be caused by trauma to the joint.

As of January 2002

20% of dogs are affected by knee conditions. 80% of dogs remain untested and/or non-symptomatic at this time.

Ostochondritis dissecans- a cartilage condition affecting young animals.  In OCD a portion of cartilage breaks away and become lodged into the joint causing pain, lameness and often if left, arthritis.  OCD can affect any joint, but most commonly affects the shoulder joint, followed by the elbow.  For our purposes OCD refers to shoulder OCD and elbow OCD is included under ED.

As of January 2002

7% of dogs are affected by OCD of the shoulder. 93% of dogs remain untested and/or non-symptomatic at this time.

Other General Conditions 

Demodectic Mange- a parasitic skin condition caused by mites.  One of 2 forms of mange diagnosed in dogs.  Demodectic mange is not contagious, but rather believed to be caused by an immune system weakness.   Because this immune system weakness is genetically controlled, Demodex is strongly accepted to be hereditary as well.   

As of January 2002

37% of dogs have been diagnosed with Demodex. disease.

63% of dogs remain unaffected.

Eye Conditions-  conditions surveyed included Cherry Eye (infection of the lacrimal glands), entropion (curling inward of the eyelid), ectropion (curling outward of the eyelid) and PRA (progressive retinal atrophy).  

As of January 2002

31% of dogs have been affected by one or more eye disease.

69% of dogs remain unaffected and/or untested.

Heart Conditions -  conditions surveyed included cardiomyopathy, a weakening of the cardiac muscles that lead to heart failure and mitral valve defects. 

As of January 2002

18% of dogs have been diagnosed with a heart disorder.. 82% of dogs remain untested.

 Epilepsy- a neurological disorder of unknown etiology causing seizures.  Can be petite mal (rare in dogs) or gran mal (affecting the whole body).  Believed to have a genetic basis. 

As of January 2002

16% had either confirmed epilepsy or seizures that had to be controlled with the use of medication. 84% of dogs remain unaffected.

 Allergies- commonly manifested as skin conditions, these include sensitivities to foods, pollens and other allergens.  Generally cause severe itching and hair loss with occasionally leading to secondary infections.

As of January 2002

24% of dogs have been affected by allergies.

76% of dogs remain unaffected.

OTHER- these include miscellaneous problems not mentioned above.  Cancers, kidney or liver diseases, bloat, thyroid, umbilical hernia, cleft lip/palate, reproductive problems, etc… 

As of January 2002

33% of dogs have been affected by other conditions.

Temperament and Behavior 

As of January 2002

6% described their dogs as confident with 22% responding that they considered their dogs friendly towards others.  58% of the respondents indicated that their dogs were shy, timid and/or fearful even after socialization and training throughout puppy-hood and adolescence. 4% respondents reported shy/timid, fearful or aggressive behavior without doing any outside socializing or training. 35% classified their Corsos as dog aggressive despite early socialization

Drives

As of January 2002

22% of respondents believed their dogs had a high defense drive 53% of respondents believed their dogs had a high prey drive

Unprovoked Aggression/Bite Incidents

As of January 2002

0-12 months of Age
57% of those surveyed described their dog as aggressive at 12 months of age or less. 46% of those surveyed responded that their dog attempted to bite a person  at 12 months of age or less 14% of respondents reported an unprovoked bite at or under 12 months. 40% reported no incident.

 

As of January 2002

13-24 months of Age

63% of those surveyed described their dog as aggressive between 13-24 months of age. 38% of those surveyed responded that their dog attempted to bite a person between 13-24 months of age. 30% reported an unprovoked bite between 13-24 months of age. 32% reported no incident.

 

As of January 2002

25 Months and Above

29% of those surveyed described their dog as aggressive from ages 25 months and above. 21% of those surveyed responded that their dog attempted to bite a person  from ages 25 months and above. 13% reported an unprovoked bite from ages 25 months and above. 66% reported no incident.

 

 

 

 

 

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